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(Astronomy) Space: ISS Astronauts Take Walk in Space

 
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adedios
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 03, 2006 6:09 am    Post subject: (Astronomy) Space: ISS Astronauts Take Walk in Space Reply with quote






ISS astronauts take walk in space
CBBC NEWSROUND
2 June 2006

Two crew members living on the International Space Station (ISS) have taken part in a space walk to carry out important repairs to their craft.
The mission was the first for Russian cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov and US astronaut Jeffrey Williams since they arrived on the ISS in April.

The crew also carried out experiments to check the amount of pollution being given out by the station's engines.

The walk took over six hours after the jobs took a bit longer than thought.


Plans to hit a gold-plated golf ball into orbit to set the record for the longest ever drive were delayed until next year.

Explore deep space

The ISS is being built by lots of countries and is being used to find out more about the Universe.

It's hoped that when it's finished in 2010 it will also be a useful launch pad for explorations into deep space.

Story from CBBC NEWSROUND:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr.....039888.stm


*************************************************************

What is the International Space Station (ISS)?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews.....736285.stm
http://www.shuttlepresskit.com/ISS_OVR/
http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....cestation/

Images and Videos of ISS

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/ga.....index.html
http://www.discovery.com/stori.....llery.html

Can you see the ISS from the ground?

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/re.....index.html
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/re.....aSSOP.html

What operations are done at the ISS?

http://scipoc.msfc.nasa.gov/
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pa.....index.html
http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....index.html

What is the structure of ISS?

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pa.....index.html
http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....index.html

How was ISS assembled?

http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....rview.html
http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....embly.html

What are the goals of ISS?

http://www.boeing.com/defense-.....goals.html

A Tour of the ISS Operations Center

http://scipoc.com/pctour.html

Inside the station

http://www.discovery.com/stori.....ation.html

ISS History

http://www.discovery.com/stori.....998_a.html

Where does space begin?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews.....595962.stm
http://www.bnsc.gov.uk/content.aspx?nid=5587
http://www.understandingspace......#TopOfPage
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/myspace/

The Learning Zone

http://www.bnsc.gov.uk/default.aspx?nid=3261

Online explorations

http://amazing-space.stsci.edu.....lorations/

What is the space shuttle?

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pa.....index.html

A virtual tour of the solar system

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/s.....tour.shtml
http://www.spacedout-uk.com/solar_system/index.asp
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/s.....ndex.shtml

What is a spacewalk?

http://www.discovery.com/stori.....ewalk.html

Bringing space into the classroom

http://www.classroomspace.org.uk/
http://www.space-explorers.com/

What is space weather?

http://www.windows.ucar.edu/to.....p;edu=high

The space missions

http://www.windows.ucar.edu/to.....p;edu=high

Who does what inside the ISS?

http://www.discovery.com/stori.....swhat.html

The Science of Space Exploration

Space Flight
http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/basics/
http://web.wt.net/~markgoll/rse0.htm

Orbital Mechanics
http://www.braeunig.us/space/orbmech.htm
http://home.cvc.org/science/kepler.htm
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/keps/kepmodel.html
http://www.rmc.ca/other/usn/ionsupp/ionsupp.htm

Aerodynamics
http://www.ae.su.oz.au/aero/aerodyn.html

Forces of Flight
http://www.boeing.com/companyo.....y/fof.html

Cosmogony
http://www.genesismission.org/.....ogony.html

Infrared astronomy
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech....._tutorial/

Aerospace structures
http://www.ae.msstate.edu/%7Em.....ourse.html

Data Analysis and Generalizations
http://www.genesismission.org/....._data.html

Planetary Diversity
http://www.genesismission.org/.....index.html

Sun
http://www.genesismission.org/.....index.html

Understanding the Elements
http://www.genesismission.org/.....index.html

GAMES

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/sightings/games.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/playspace/
http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/to.....games.html


Last edited by adedios on Sat Jan 27, 2007 5:01 pm; edited 2 times in total
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adedios
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 7:40 pm    Post subject: Doctors to Attempt First-Ever Zero G Surgery Reply with quote

Doctors to Attempt First-Ever Zero G Surgery

By Aurelie Toulemonde
Associated Press Writer
posted: 25 September 2006
5:42 p.m. ET



PARIS (AP) – A team of French doctors will operate on a man under near-weightless conditions on Wednesday – a world first and what they hope will be a step toward performing surgery in space.

Whizzing above southwest France aboard a specially modified Airbus, strapped-down surgeons will attempt to remove a fatty tumor from the forearm of a volunteer in a three-hour operation.

The Airbus A300 Zero-G, based in Bordeaux, is designed to perform roller coaster-like maneuvers that simulate weightlessness. It will make about 30 such parabolas during the flight.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/hum.....rgery.html
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adedios
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2007 10:44 am    Post subject: Space Station and Shuttle Visible Together in Night Sky Reply with quote

Space Station and Shuttle Visible Together in Night Sky
By Joe Rao, SPACE.com Skywatching Columnist

posted: 19 June 2007 09:25 am ET

With the Space Shuttle Atlantis scheduled to undock from the International Space Station (ISS) on Tuesday, skywatchers across much of the United States and southern Canada are in for a real treat on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings.

Should weather conditions permit to offer clear skies, there will be a few opportunities to see both the Atlantis orbiter and the ISS flying across the sky from many locations.

The sight should easily be visible to anyone, even from brightly-lit cities.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/spa.....e_iss.html
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adedios
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:13 am    Post subject: New Technique for Observing Faint Companions Reply with quote

ESO 28/07 - Science Release
19 June 2007

Back on Track
New Technique for Observing Faint Companions
Observing the image of a faint object that lies close to a star is a demanding task as the object is generally hidden in the glare of the star. Characterising this object, by taking spectra, is an even harder challenge. Still, thanks to ingenious scientists and a new ESO imaging spectrograph, this is now feasible, paving the way to an eldorado of many new thrilling discoveries.

These very high contrast observations are fundamental for directly imaging unknown extra-solar planets (i.e. planets orbiting a star other than the Sun), as well as low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, those failed stars that are too small to start burning hydrogen into helium.


For the full article:

http://www.eso.org/public/outr.....28-07.html
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adedios
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2007 7:54 am    Post subject: Revealing the nature of exoplanets Reply with quote

Week of July 14, 2007; Vol. 172, No. 2 , p. 24

Passages
Revealing the nature of exoplanets

Ron Cowen

Eleven years ago, David Charbonneau was a new graduate student at Harvard University's astronomy department, eager to explore the birth of the universe. "Then I learned of the incredible first discoveries that had just been announced in exoplanets," he recalls. Those objects, the first planets found outside the solar system, prompted Charbonneau to drop the Big Bang like a hot potato. He's been hunting for exoplanets ever since.

For the full article:

http://sciencenews.org/articles/20070714/bob8.asp
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adedios
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 1:34 pm    Post subject: Killer electrons in space are now less mysterious Reply with quote

Killer electrons in space are now less mysterious
ESA

26 July 2007

A rare, timely conjunction of ground-based instrumentation and a dozen satellites has helped scientists better understand how electrons in space can turn into ‘killers’. ESA’s Cluster constellation has contributed crucially to the finding.

‘Killer’ electrons are highly energetic, negatively charged particles found in near-Earth space. They can critically, and even permanently, damage satellites in orbit, including telecommunication satellites, and pose a hazard to astronauts.

For the full article:

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMEUMB474F_index_0.html
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2007 11:54 am    Post subject: Introducing Sky in Google Earth Reply with quote

Introducing Sky in Google Earth

New feature in Google Earth enables users to explore space from their computer

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (August 22, 2007) - Google today announced the launch of Sky, a new feature that enables users of Google Earth to view the sky as seen from planet Earth.

With Sky, users can now float through the skies via Google Earth. This easy-to-use tool enables all Earth users to view and navigate through 100 million individual stars and 200 million galaxies. High resolution imagery and informative overlays create a unique playground for visualizing and learning about space.

For the full article:

http://www.google.com/intl/en/.....70822.html

Explore the sky in Google Earth 4.2:

http://earth.google.com/sky/skyedu.html
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 5:12 pm    Post subject: Cosmic ray mystery solved? Reply with quote

University of Utah
8 November 2007

Cosmic ray mystery solved?
Universe's most energetic particles point to huge black holes

The most energetic particles in the universe – ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays – likely come from supermassive black holes in the hearts of nearby active galaxies, says a study by scientists from nearly 90 research institutions worldwide, including the University of Utah.

“We discovered the sources of the highest energy particles in the universe,” says Miguel Mostafa, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Utah and one of 370 scientists and engineers belonging to a 17-nation collaboration that operates the $54 million Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina.

“The sources are the center regions of very active galaxies which host violent black holes” and are known as “active galactic nuclei,” he adds. “Now that we found the sources, we are one step closer to knowing what physical process can accelerate particles to these ultrahigh energies. Right now, we don’t know.”

The study by the Pierre Auger Collaboration is being published in the Friday, Nov. 9 issue of the journal Science. Members of the collaboration at the University of Utah are Mostafa; physicist and Dean of Science Pierre Sokolsky; postdoctoral research associate Patrick Younk; and physics graduate student David Thomas. Two undergraduate students – Joshua Schmeiser and Felix Lau – also work on the project.

Black holes are collapsed stars with gravity so strong that nothing – not even light – can escape once it has fallen past the black hole’s “event horizon.” Scientists believe most galaxies, including ours, host supermassive black holes, which contain the mass of up to a few billion stars like our sun.

When matter is sucked into supermassive black holes, the process also spews out various particles and electromagnetic radiation, from gamma and X-rays to ultraviolet, visible and infrared light, and radio waves. A galaxy with a compact center that is extremely, persistently bright in all or some wavelengths is known as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Only a fraction of galaxies with supermassive black holes are AGNs.

From the Fly’s Eye to the Auger Observatory

Cosmic rays, discovered in 1912, are subatomic particles, including nuclei of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen or iron. Medium-energy cosmic rays come from exploding stars. The sun and other stars emit lower-energy cosmic rays. The source of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays has been unexplained. They are 100 million times more energetic than anything produced by the most powerful particle smashers on Earth.

Suspected sources have included not only supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, but also noisy radio galaxies, shock waves from colliding galaxies, and bizarre sources such as so-called cosmic strings or the decay of massive particles left over from the “big bang” that scientists believe formed the universe 13 billion years ago.

The highest-energy cosmic ray ever detected was measured in 1991 by the University of Utah’s Fly’s Eye observatory on the U.S. Army’s Dugway Proving Ground. It had an energy of 300 billion billion electron volts (billion twice is correct, or 3 times 10 to the 20th power electron volts). The single subatomic particle would feel like a fast-pitched baseball if it could penetrate the atmosphere and hit a person in the head.

In 1996, an international group of physicists proposed building the Pierre Auger Project: twin $50 million cosmic ray observatories in Argentina and Utah. (Auger was a French physicist who, in 1938, discovered “air showers” of particles produced when incoming cosmic rays hit gas in Earth’s upper atmosphere.) The Argentina observatory was built first to look for cosmic rays in southern skies. The Northern Hemisphere observatory now is planned for Colorado.

Construction in Argentina started in 1999. The Auger Observatory – the world’s largest cosmic ray observatory – began collecting data in 2004. The observatory includes a 1,200-square-mile grid of 1,600 large, instrumented water tanks – which detect particles from air showers – and four sites with a total of 24 telescopes that detect faint fluorescent flashes in the sky caused when a cosmic ray particle triggers an air shower.

The Study: Ultrahigh-energy Cosmic Rays Correlate with Active Galaxies

In the study in Science, the Auger collaboration reports the observatory has recorded 77 cosmic rays with ultrahigh-energies above 40 billion billion electron volts (billion twice is correct, or 4 times 10 to the 19th power electron volts).

Of the 27 most energetic events – those with energies above 57 billion billion electron volts – 20 come from the direction of the known locations of some of the 318 active galactic nuclei with the Auger Observatory’s field of view, Mostafa says.

If the cosmic rays were coming randomly from all directions, only five or six would correlate with the known locations of the active galaxies, he adds.

The researchers report there is less than a one-in-100 chance that the correlation between ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and active galactic nuclei is random, not real.

Mostafa says the galaxies spewing super-energetic cosmic rays must be relatively close to our Milky Way galaxy, within a distance of 100 megaparsecs, which works out to 326 million light years or 1,920 billion billion miles. (Billion twice is correct).

“This is our local neighborhood in cosmic terms,” he says.

Most ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays from greater distances would lose energy before they reach Earth because they interact with cosmic microwave background radiation – the “afterglow” of the “big bang.”

The University of Utah’s Contributions

Mostafa’s group at the University of Utah played a key role in designing, building and operating two lasers and four lidar (light detection and ranging) devices to monitor dust, clouds, water vapor and other atmospheric conditions above the Auger Observatory.

The devices ensure the accuracy of the fluorescence telescopes by helping scientists determine how much light is generated by a cosmic ray air shower, and how much that light is enhanced when it scatters off dust and vapor in the atmosphere.

Mostafa’s group also developed the “geometrical reconstruction technique” to analyze “hybrid” data from Auger’s tank-like particle detectors and florescence-detecting telescopes. The computer software uses that data to provide more precise information on the direction in space from which an incoming ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray originated.

Mostafa’s geometrical reconstruction method also will help physicists learn more about the specific process responsible for hurling ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays across space. While the black holes are thought to accelerate cosmic rays, another kind of theory holds that the highest-energy cosmic rays are photons – light particles – produced by the decay of superheavy particles left over from the birth of the universe. Mostafa’s method shows there are few if any photons with energy levels consistent with such theories.

The University of Utah is a pioneer in cosmic ray research. After atmospheric humidity stymied a 1950s effort to observe cosmic rays from upstate New York, University of Utah physicists built a prototype in New Mexico in 1976, constructed the Fly’s Eye at Dugway Proving Ground during 1980-1981, improved it in 1986, and then upgraded it during 1994-1999 and renamed it the High-Resolution Fly’s Eye. The name comes from the use of fly-like multifaceted mirrors to observe the sky.

The Hi-Res Fly’s Eye is shutting down and some of its equipment is being moved to the new $17 million Telescope Array cosmic ray observatory, which was built west of Delta, Utah, by the University of Tokyo and University of Utah.

Meanwhile, Mostafa’s group is responsible for designing the fluorescence detectors at the planned northern Auger Observatory in southeast Colorado near Lamar.


###
For information and photos on the Auger Observatory, see: http://www.auger.org/media
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 1:50 pm    Post subject: A Whole Lot of Nothing Reply with quote

A Whole Lot of Nothing
Emily Sohn

Dec. 19, 2007

Larry Rudnick looked deep into outer space and saw—nothing. The discovery thrilled him.
"I came home, sat at the dinner table, and told my wife, 'We found something pretty exciting today,'" says Rudnick, an astronomer at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

What he found was the biggest expanse of nothing ever discovered. Inside the void, there are hardly any galaxies, planets, or black holes—just mostly empty space spanning an area that's a billion light-years across.


For the full article:

http://www.sciencenewsforkids......ature1.asp
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