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(Bio) (Earth) Marine Life: Fish with Chips
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adedios
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Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 10:59 am    Post subject: Project SeaCamel: Classroom Aquarius Marine Education Live Reply with quote

Project SeaCamel: Classroom Aquarius Marine Education Live

LIVING OCEANS Foundation

Classroom modules are broadcast live from the NOAA Aquarius, the world’s only underwater laboratory, at the times shown below. They are unscripted reality TV from the bottom of the sea, involving real scientists doing real experiments, funded by the Living Oceans Foundation. They are geared to a university audience, but accessible to advanced high school students and college undergraduates. Each module has ancillary reading, and web resources, and most have associated data sets suit-able for use in guided quantitative exercises. Come dive with us, and expect the unexpected!

In November 2007, the Living Oceans Foundation will be conducting and broadcasting six live “underwater classrooms” which will take place sixty feet below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean on the coral reefs of the Florida Keys. The broadcasts will run over a period of three days while scientists and videographers live submerged at sixty feet underwater in NOAA’s Aquarius habitat, called America’s “inner space station”.

The underwater classrooms will run for approximately forty-five minutes and will focus on a variety of subjects including coral and sponge biology, physical oceanography, and the Aquarius habitat as an artificial reef. To see details of each of the underwater classroom broadcasts go to “Science Modules”.

http://seacamel.livingoceansfoundation.org/
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adedios
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 7:01 am    Post subject: Behind the Scenes:Life at Sea: An Oceanographer's Adventure Reply with quote

Behind the Scenes:Life at Sea: An Oceanographer's Adventure
By Cassandra Lopez, University of Miami

posted: 02 November 2007 03:49 pm ET

This Behind the Scenes article was provided to LiveScience in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

Life at sea is very different from life on land . . . Or is it? It may be hard to imagine spending weeks at a time at sea, but for many in our ocean-going team made up of scientists, technicians and students, living and working at sea is an important part of our careers.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/env.....-life.html
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adedios
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 5:49 pm    Post subject: Government plan to revive “Dead Zone” in Gulf of Mexico coul Reply with quote

Government plan to revive “Dead Zone” in Gulf of Mexico could backfire
5 November 2007
Environmental Science & Technology

The potential revision to the government’s approach for rejuvenating a huge “Dead Zone” in the Gulf of Mexico is potentially dangerous and should be reconsidered, scientists in Michigan are reporting in a study scheduled for the Dec. 1 issue of ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

In the study, Donald Scavia and Kristina A. Donnelly point out that the Gulf of Mexico has one of the largest hypoxic, or oxygen-depleted, areas in the world. Fish and plants in this 6,000 square mile “Dead Zone” have been devastated, leaving the waters incapable of sustaining many types of aquatic life. In response, an intergovernmental task force gave the U. S. Congress and the President a so-called Hypoxia Action Plan in 2001, which aimed to reduce the size of the Dead Zone. That original plan called for reducing nitrogen loads to the Gulf, but recent assessments are considering phosphorous as the limiting factor in controlling the algae blooms that deplete oxygen from the Gulf water, and focusing on reducing sewage discharges and other inputs of phosphorous.

The new study concluded that pollution control efforts must continue to focus on nitrogen even if phosphorus controls are added. It found that a phosphorus-only approach is potentially dangerous. Using mathematical model estimates and real-world data from other hypoxia reduction experiences in North Carolina and Hong Kong waters, the researchers suggest that a phosphorous-only approach could possibly enlarge the Dead Zone, extending it into the western portion of the Gulf. “The prudent approach would be to address both nitrogen and phosphorous,” the researchers said.

ARTICLE #2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
“Reassessing Hypoxia Forecasts for the Gulf of Mexico”

DOWNLOAD PDF http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/sa.....714235.pdf
DOWNLOAD HTML http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/sa.....14235.html
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adedios
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 11:02 am    Post subject: Got a science question with no answer? Ask Dr. Bob Reply with quote

Texas A&M University

Got a science question with no answer? Ask Dr. Bob

COLLEGE STATION, Feb. 25, 2008 – You’re writing a research paper or you’re teaching a high school science class and you’re stumped – you need an answer, and pronto. What to do?

You ask Dr. Bob.

Dr. Bob, also known as Bob Stewart to his students and friends, is a professor of oceanography at Texas A&M University who has tried to communicate his love of science and the ocean to as many people as possible – students, teachers, fellow professors, anyone he can help.

To do so, he started his “Ask Dr. Bob” ocean science website seven years ago, and as they say in the science world, eureka! He found his calling, and like a creature in a science fiction movie, the site has taken on a very real life of its own.

From one or two questions a week, he now receives dozens of queries every month as the word as gotten out about his Oceanworld site and his helpful – and accurate – information that is available for free to anyone who needs an answer.

On the information highway, there is now a helpful Q and A science rest stop that is hard to beat.

The Fort Worth native has become a sort of Wizard of the Web who has a loyal following. About 1,000 other websites around the world now have links to his Oceanword site.

“We’ve been doing this for years now and it’s still fun,” Stewart explains from his campus office.

“But it’s rewarding to know that we are helping people, too, and many of them are thousands of miles from the Texas A&M campus. Every day is a new challenge and we always seem to get interesting questions that we are glad to help answer.”

Not only are students and teachers impressed, but so have been the folks at NASA. In previous years, they’ve awarded Stewart a $100,000 yearly contract to support his Internet operations – they like to see those questions coming in, as many as possible, because such sites get the general public interested in science, not an easy trick to do.

Others have noticed, too. A few months ago, Oceanworld received the 2007 Best Web Site Award from the Geoscience Information Society for its content, technical considerations, design, organization and overall effectiveness and Stewart accepted the award in Denver, Colo., during the group’s annual meeting. The “Ask Dr. Bob” site is a link from the main site.

The questions, meanwhile, keep Dr. Bob busy.

A third-grader needs some help regarding tides, while a middle school teacher wants some information about carbon dioxide sources. A professor at another university is asking about detailed tsunami research. They all contact Dr. Bob, who makes a determined effort to answer them as quickly as possible – knowledge has deadlines, too, he understands.

The million dollar question: Has he ever been totally stumped"

“Not yet,” Stewart replies.

“I’ve learned that if I don’t have answer right at hand, I can get it very quickly, often in less than five minutes.”

Oceanworld was developed with the help of several graduate assistants who write material for the website, but when it comes to answering the questions, it’s all about Bob – he answers each and every one himself.

He can often tell if a student is doing a homework assignment and he or she wants Stewart to answer a series of questions. If that’s the case, he will list some sites and try to point them in the right direction for the answer.

“And we’ll get a question once or a month or so that has to do with medicine or a cancer treatment. We have to say that we cannot give out medical advice and politely tell them that Dr. Bob is not a medical doctor,” Stewart adds.

Stewart, who has taught at Texas A&M for 18 years, served as a researcher at the renowned Scripps Institute of Oceanography for more than 25 years. He learned then that relating others to science is part of the big picture.

“I’ve said this before and I will say it again: I think it is very important that we in the academic community try to make knowledge more available,” Stewart believes.

“We should try to help everyone who is trying to learn, not just students. The Ask Dr. Bob site shows that Texas A&M cares about all people who want to learn, and it’s a way to pay back the people who pay our salary. If we can help people with an answer to their question, we should do it.”

He practices what he preaches.


###

Noting that many college textbooks cost $100 or more, Stewart has made available free copies of the three textbooks he has authored, and students can download off the Internet at no cost the full content of his books. Some of those books are now available in Portugese, Spanish, Italian, Russian and other languages.

Inquiring minds – the kind Dr. Bob likes most of all – can learn more at http://oceanworld.tamu.edu
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