PAETE.ORG FORUMS
Paetenians Home on the Net

HOME | ABOUT PAETE | USAP PAETE MUNISIPYO  | MEMBERS ONLY  | PICTORIAL PAETE | SINING PAETE  | LINKS  |

FORUM GUIDELINES
please read before posting

USAP PAETE Forum Index USAP PAETE
Discussion Forums for the people of Paete, Laguna, Philippines
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch    UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

(Astronomy) Solar System (Definition of Planet)

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    USAP PAETE Forum Index -> Science Lessons Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:26 am    Post subject: (Astronomy) Solar System (Definition of Planet) Reply with quote






Pluto and the Plutons
23 August 2006

Emily Sohn

It's a planet! No, it's not! Yes, it is! No, it's not!
It sounds like a schoolyard spat, but astronomers have been debating for years whether Pluto is truly a planet.

Many people want to keep Pluto in the planet family. So, astronomers are now considering a way to define "planet" so that Pluto remains one. But this means that other bodies in the solar system would also qualify to be called planets.

If the new definition is approved by astronomers, the official number of planets will go from 9 to 12. Eventually, there may be dozens more.

For the full article (photos and links):

http://www.sciencenewsforkids....../Note3.asp

*************************************************************

Questions to explore further this topic:

What is the new definition of a planet?

http://www.iau2006.org/mirror/.....lease.html
According to that panel's proposal, announced this week in Prague, a planet is any body that orbits a star, is neither a star nor a satellite of a planet, and has gravity strong enough to pull it into a rounded shape.
http://www.sciencenews.org/art.....9/fob1.asp

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/s.....index.html (see next post under this topic)

The IAU members gathered at the 2006 General Assembly agreed that a "planet" is defined as a celestial body that (a) is in orbit around the Sun, (b) has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a hydrostatic equilibrium (nearly round) shape, and (c) has cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit.

This means that the Solar System now consists of eight "planets" Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.


What is the solar system?

http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov.....ystem.html
http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov.....ystem.html
http://spacekids.hq.nasa.gov/o.....e/mac.html
http://sse.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm
http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/planets/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/solarsystem/
http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/a.....mjava.html
http://www.nationalgeographic......plash.html
http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr161/lect/index.html
http://www.solarsystem.org.uk/
http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/P.....larSystem/
http://stardate.org/resources/ssguide/
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/Mirrors/nineplanets/

What is the origin of the solar system?

http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/ast.....bular.html

How big is the solar system?

http://www.noao.edu/education/.....cmain.html

How do planets move in the solar system?

http://vathena.arc.nasa.gov/curric/space/planets/

The Sun

http://www.paete.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1143


GAMES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/s.....gsaw.shtml
http://space.jpl.nasa.gov/


Last edited by adedios on Sat Jan 27, 2007 5:01 pm; edited 4 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2006 6:39 am    Post subject: Only Eight Planets in the Solar System Reply with quote

Only Eight Planets in the Solar System Based on the New Definition
25 August 2006
International Astronomical Union (IAU)

The IAU members gathered at the 2006 General Assembly agreed that a "planet" is defined as a celestial body that (a) is in orbit around the Sun, (b) has sufficient mass for its self-gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a hydrostatic equilibrium (nearly round) shape, and (c) has cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit.

This means that the Solar System consists of eight "planets" Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.


A new distinct class of objects called "dwarf planets" was also decided. It was agreed that "planets" and "dwarf planets" are two distinct classes of objects. The first members of the "dwarf planet" category are Ceres, Pluto and 2003 UB313 (temporary name). More "dwarf planets" are expected to be announced by the IAU in the coming months and years. Currently a dozen candidate "dwarf planets" are listed on IAU's "dwarf planet" watchlist, which keeps changing as new objects are found and the physics of the existing candidates becomes better known.

The "dwarf planet" Pluto is recognised as an important proto-type of a new class of trans-Neptunian objects. The IAU will set up a process to name these objects.


For the full story:

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/s.....index.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 2:29 pm    Post subject: Students won’t miss Pluto, say Iloilo teachers Reply with quote

Students won’t miss Pluto, say Iloilo teachers


By Ma. Diosa Labiste
Inquirer
Last updated 04:01am (Mla time) 09/11/2006

Published on Page A21 of the September 11, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

ILOILO CITY—Science teachers in Iloilo sing no dirges for Pluto, the erstwhile ninth planet in the solar system, and their students are not sentimental about its fate.

Some high school teachers have said they easily explained the status of Pluto to their students with the help of the Internet, scale models of solar systems and classroom discussions, although Pluto is still enshrined in their textbooks as a planet.

The International Astronomical Union (IAU) members voted late last month to drop Pluto from the list of planets in the solar system. Based on their new definition, a planet must orbit the sun, must have sufficient mass for its gravity to overcome rigid body forces so that it assumes a hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape). It must have cleared the neighborhood around its orbit.

Pluto satisfies the first two criteria but not the third because its oblong orbit overlaps Neptune’s. Under the new definition, Pluto is a “dwarf planet.”

For the full article;

http://newsinfo.inq7.net/inqui.....e_id=20231
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 3:14 pm    Post subject: Hubble observations confirm that planets form from disks aro Reply with quote

Hubble observations confirm that planets form from disks around stars

NASA/ESA

09-Oct-2006: The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, in collaboration with ground-based observatories, has at last confirmed what philosopher Emmanuel Kant and scientists have long predicted: that planets form from debris disks around stars.


More than 200 years ago, the philosopher Emmanuel Kant first proposed that planets are born from disks of dust and gas that swirl around their home stars. Though astronomers have detected more than 200 extrasolar planets and have seen many debris disks around young stars, they have yet to observe a planet and a debris disk around the same star. Now, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, in collaboration with ground-based observatories, has at last confirmed what Kant and scientists have long predicted: that planets form from debris disks around stars.


For the full article:

http://www.spacetelescope.org/.....c0613.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2006 7:06 am    Post subject: What's a Planet? Reply with quote

What's a Planet?
New riddles beyond the solar system

2 December 2006
Ron Cowen

"I found a planet!" Caltech astronomer Mike Brown remembers exclaiming during a phone call he made to his wife early in 2005. Little did he know that he'd have to eat his words just 18 months later. Brown had found an outer–solar system object heavier than Pluto, so it seemed reasonable to call the object the tenth planet.


But last August, the International Astronomical Union approved the first formal definition of a planet since the Greeks coined the term some 2,000 years ago. Pluto, got the boot, and Brown's proposed tenth planet, a body now called Eris, was disqualified.

For the full article:

http://sciencenews.org/articles/20061202/bob8.asp
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 2:08 pm    Post subject: Specimens show that inner and outer solar system mixed Reply with quote

Week of Dec. 16, 2006; Vol. 170, No. 25 , p. 387

Comet Sampler: Specimens show that inner and outer solar system mixed
Ron Cowen

Just as the solar system was forming some 4.6 billion years ago, it turned itself inside out. Some of the hottest material, residing so close to the sun that it almost vaporized, sped out to the chilliest reaches of deep space. These bits of formerly high-temperature dust ultimately became parts of the icy balls known as comets.

That startling scenario—in stark contrast to a widely held view that outlying regions grew up isolated from the inner solar system—is revealed by the first analyses of cometary-dust grains brought back to Earth by a spacecraft. NASA's Stardust craft passed through the dusty shroud of a comet called Wild 2 in 2004 and last January dropped to Earth a canister of the material that the mission had collected (SN: 3/25/06, p. 182: http://www.sciencenews.org/art.....5/fob7.asp).

For the full article:

http://sciencenews.org/articles/20061216/fob1.asp
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 8:32 am    Post subject: Defining Planethood Reply with quote

Defining Planethood
Emily Sohn

Feb. 28, 2007

Textbooks are supposed to be full of facts, but you can't always believe what you read. Especially when the topic is Pluto.
Last August, after 75 years of planethood, Pluto lost its status when the International Astronomical Union (IAU) came up with a new definition of what it means to be a planet.

Within a week, more than 300 scientists had signed a petition rejecting the new definition. An alternative definition would have let Pluto keep its status as a planet and added at least three other objects to the list of planets.

No matter what the final verdict, the debate will be a good one, says planetary scientist Mark Sykes. He's director of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Ariz.

"It's an opportunity to lay out what we've learned about the solar system in the last 40 years," Sykes says. "It's a good diving board to go off into larger issues."

For the full article:

http://www.sciencenewsforkids......ature1.asp
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:07 am    Post subject: Climate catastrophes in the Solar System Reply with quote

Climate catastrophes in the Solar System
European Space Agency

The contrast: Venus, Earth and Mars

26 April 2007
Earth sits between two worlds that have been devastated by climate catastrophes. In the effort to combat global warming, our neighbours can provide valuable insights into the way climate catastrophes affect planets.

Modelling Earth’s climate to predict its future has assumed tremendous importance in the light of mankind’s influence on the atmosphere. The climate of our two neighbours is in stark contrast to that of our home planet, making data from ESA’s Venus Express and Mars Express invaluable to climate scientists.

For the full article:

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM2EHMJC0F_index_0.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2007 9:17 am    Post subject: Solar System Sails Sideways Through Milky Way Reply with quote

Solar System Sails Sideways Through Milky Way
By Ker Than, Staff Writer

posted: 15 May 2007 06:39 am ET

Our solar system is hurtling through space while angled nearly perpendicular to the plane of the Milky Way, new computer models suggest.

"It's almost like we're sailing through the galaxy sideways," said study team leader Merav Opher, an astrophysicist at George Mason University in Virginia.

The findings, detailed in the May 11 issue of the journal Science, suggest the magnetic field in the galactic environment surrounding our solar system is pitched at a sharp angle and not oriented parallel to the plane of the Milky Way as previously thought.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/spa.....field.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 8:34 am    Post subject: How Solar Systems are Organized Reply with quote

How Solar Systems are Organized
By Ker Than, Staff Writer

posted: 17 July 2007 07:55 am ET

It is the rare gas giant planet that inhabits the outskirts of its solar system. Most are like our own Jupiter and prefer to stick close to their stars, a new study suggests.

The finding, to be detailed in an upcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal, helps give astronomers a better sense of how planets are arranged in the universe at large.

"Now that we know there aren't large numbers of giant planets lurking at large distances from their stars, astronomers have a more complete picture and can better constrain [in theory and in models] how planets are formed," said study leader Beth Biller of the University of Arizona.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/spa.....hjups.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:59 pm    Post subject: Planet System Similar to Ours Revealed Reply with quote

Planet System Similar to Ours Revealed
By Ker Than, Staff Writer

posted: 06 November 2007 01:26 pm ET

Scientists announced today the discovery of a fifth planet in a distant star system that that now looks like a "cousin" to our own.

Known as 55 Cancri, the sun-like star harbors the most number of planets ever discovered outside our solar system.

"We now know that our sun and its family of planets is not unusual," study team member Geoffrey Marcy of the University of California, Berkeley told reporters in a teleconference. "Architecturally, this new planetary system is reminiscent of ours, albeit souped-up. All the planets in this new system are more massive by factors of 5 to 10."

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/spa.....anets.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 6:09 pm    Post subject: Astronomers find stellar cradle where planets form Reply with quote

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
29 November 2007

Astronomers find stellar cradle where planets form

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Astronomers at the University of Illinois have found the first clear evidence for a cradle in space where planets and moons form. The cradle, revealed in photographs taken with NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, consists of a flattened envelope of gas and dust surrounding a young protostar.

“We are seeing this object in the early stages of stellar birth,” said U. of I. astronomy professor Leslie Looney, the lead author of a paper accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters. “Eventually, the protostar will form into a star much like our sun, and the disk will form into planets and moons.”

Located about 800 light-years away in the constellation Cepheus, the object is obscured by dust and therefore invisible to the eye. However, the Spitzer Space Telescope’s sensitive infrared camera can penetrate the dust, and reveal the structures within.

The brightest structure consists of an enormous, almost linear flow of shocked molecular hydrogen gas erupting from the protostar’s two magnetic poles. These bipolar jets are so long, light would take about 1 1/2 years to travel from one end to the other.

In star-formation theory, a cloud of gas and dust collapses to form a star and its planets. As the cloud collapses, it begins to rotate faster and faster, like a pirouetting ice skater pulling in her arms. The force of the growing magnetic field ejects some of the gas and dust along the magnetic axis, forming the bipolar jets seen in the photograph.

“If material was not shed in this fashion, the protostar’s spin would speed up so fast it would break apart,” Looney said.

The planet-forming region is perpendicular to, and roughly centered on the polar jets. There, seen in silhouette against a bright background of galactic infrared emission, is the flattened disk of a circumstellar envelope.

Theorized, but never before seen, the flattened disk is an expected outcome for cloud-collapse theories that include magnetic fields or rotation.

“Some theories had predicted that envelopes flatten as they collapse onto their stars and surrounding planet-forming disks,” Looney said, “but we hadn’t seen any strong evidence of this until now.”


###
With Looney, co-authors of the paper are former undergraduate student John Tobin (now at the University of Michigan) and graduate student Woojin Kwon. The Spitzer Space Telescope is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology. Funding was provided by NASA.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2007 6:47 pm    Post subject: Earliest Stage of Planet Formation Dated Reply with quote

Earliest Stage of Planet Formation Dated
UC Davis
December 19, 2007

UC Davis researchers have dated the earliest step in the formation of the solar system -- when microscopic interstellar dust coalesced into mountain-sized chunks of rock -- to 4,568 million years ago, within a range of about 2,080,000 years.

UC Davis postdoctoral researcher Frederic Moynier, Qing-zhu Yin, assistant professor of geology, and graduate student Benjamin Jacobsen established the dates by analyzing a particular type of meteorite, called a carbonaceous chondrite, which represents the oldest material left over from the formation of the solar system.

The physics and timing of this first stage of planet formation are not well understood, Yin said. So, putting time constraints on the process should help guide the physical models that could be used to explain it.

In the second stage, mountain-sized masses grew quickly into about 20 Mars-sized planets and, in the third and final stage, these small planets smashed into each other in a series of giant collisions that left the planets we know today. The dates of those stages are well established.

Carbonaceous chondrites are made up of globules of silica and grains of metals embedded in black, organic-rich matrix of interstellar dust. The matrix is relatively rich in the element manganese, and the globules are rich in chromium. Looking at a number of different meteorites collected on Earth, the researchers found a straight-line relationship between the ratio of the amount of manganese to that of chromium, the amount of matrix in the meteorites, and the amount of chromium-53.

These meteorites never became large enough to heat up from radioactive decay, so they have never been melted, Yin said. They are "cosmic sediments," he said.

By measuring the amount of chromium-53, Yin said, they could work out how much of the radioactive isotope manganese-53 had initially been present, giving an indication of age. They then compared the amount of manganese-53 to slightly younger igneous (molten) meteorites of known age, called angrites.

The UC Davis researchers estimate the timing of the formation of the carbonaceous chondrites at 4,568 million years ago, ranging from 910,000 years before that date to 1,170,000 years later.

"We've captured a moment in history when this material got packed together," Yin said.

The work is published in the Dec. 20 issue of Astrophysical Journal Letters, and was funded by grants from NASA.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:48 pm    Post subject: The Enduring Mysteries of the Outer Solar System Reply with quote

The Enduring Mysteries of the Outer Solar System
By Charles Q. Choi, Special to SPACE.com

posted: 31 December 2007 7:00 a.m. ET

The farthest reaches of our solar system remain the most mysterious areas around the sun. Solving the mysteries of the outer solar system could shed light on how the whole thing emerged — as well as how life on Earth was born.

For the full article:

http://www.livescience.com/spa.....eries.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
adedios
SuperPoster


Joined: 06 Jul 2005
Posts: 5060
Location: Angel C. de Dios

PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:45 am    Post subject: Uncommon Earth Reply with quote

Uncommon Earth
By Ashley Yeager
August 30th, 2008; Vol.174 #5

Goldilocks isn’t the only one who demanded everything to be “just right.” The Earth and its fellow seven planets also needed perfect conditions to form as observed, and those right conditions occur rarely, a new computer simulation shows.

For the full article:

http://sciencenews.org/view/ge.....mmon_Earth
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   printer-friendly view    USAP PAETE Forum Index -> Science Lessons Forum All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group