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EDJAWAN FAMILY TREE

 
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jimbol



Joined: 24 Aug 2009
Posts: 234

PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:04 pm    Post subject: EDJAWAN FAMILY TREE Reply with quote

Ang Pulungan ng mga “Edjawan” dito sa Paete ay ay sinimulan lamang sa nakilalang pinakamatandang Edjawan na magkapatid sa katauhan nina Mariano Edjawan at Andrea Edjawan.

I – Mariano Edjawan – naging asawa si Marcela Adea na kapatid nina Agaton, Teodorico, Damaso, Anacleto at Roberta Adea.

Naging mga anak (2)
1. Mateo A. Edjawan – nagng asawa si Petra Valdres na kapatid ni Inocencia Valdres. Pero wala silang naging anak ni Mateo.
2. Tomas A. Edjawan – naging asaw si Felicisima E. Dagunton na anak ng mag asawang sina Pedro Dagunton at Silvestra Edlagan.

Naging mga anak (6)
A. Librada D. Edjawan – dalaga ng mamatay.
B. Floro D. Edjawan – namatay noong bata pa lang.
C. Mariano D. Edjawan – naging asawa si Estelita Dizon na taga Nueva, Ecija. (no other info.)
D. Francisca D. Edjawan – naging asawa si Sesenando C. Navarro na anak ng mag asawang sina Ciriaco Navarro at Inocencia Cadang.

Naging mga anak (6)
D1. Antonino E. Navarro
D2. Clemencia E. Navarro
D3. Lourdes E. Navarro
D4. Guillermo E. Navarro
D5. Aniceta E. Navarro
D6. Sesenando E. Navarro Jr.

E. Mateo D. Edjawan – nagng asawa si Nena Rodreguez na taga Sariyaya, Quezon. (no other info.)
F. Anita D. Edjawan – no info.


II – Andrea Edajawan – naging unang asawa si Mateo Aga.

Naging mga anak (3)
1. Felipa E. Aga – naging unang asawa si Saturnino Cadayin.
Naging mga anak (5)
A. Marciana A. Cadayin – naging asawa si Gavino Cahanap.

Naging mga anak (3)
A1. Isidra C. Cahanap
A2. Daniel C. Cahanap
A3. Teodora C. Cahanap

B. Serapia A. Cadayin – naging asawa si Nazario Ac-ac na kapatid nina Canuto, Francisca, Vicenta at Cornelio Ac-ac.

Naginng mga anak (8)
B1. Dionesia C. Ac-ac
B2. Flaviana C. Ac-ac
B3. Castor C. Ac-ac
B4. Alfonso C. Ac-ac
B5. Francisco Ac-ac
B6. Marcelo C. Ac-ac
B7. Arcadio C. Ac-ac
B8. Leonor C. Ac-ac

C. Ambrocia A. Cadayin – dalaga na ng mamatay.
D. Juana A. Cadayin – naging asawa si Venancio Baldemor.

Naging mga anak (4)
D1. Santos C. Baldemor
D2. Bernabe C. Baldemor
D3. Narciso C. Baldemor
D4. Ambrocio C. Baldemor

E. Ireneo A. Cadayin – naging asawa si Juana ________?
na taga Pakil, Laguna.

Naging mga anak (4)
E1. Sulpicia Cadayin
E2. Numeriano Cadayin
E3. Felipa Cadayin
E4. Arsenia Cadayin

Naging ikalawang asawa ni Felipa E. Aga si Juan Cadawas.

Naging mga anak (5)
F. Zacarias A. Cadawas – naging asawa si Ines U. Malinao na anak ng mag asawang sina Francisco Malinao at Marcela Umali.

Naging mga anak (4)
F1. Maria M. Cadawas
F2. Silverio M. Cadawas
F3. Julio M. Cadawas
F4. Vicente M. Cadawas

G. Fidel A. Cadawas – binata na ng mamatay.
H . Eugenio A. Cadawas – naging asawa si Josefa D. Valdellon na anak ng mag asawang sina Francisco Valdellon at Agueda Dacsil.

Naging mga anak (4)
H1. Maura V. Cadawas
H2. Roberto V. Cadawas
H3. Aniceto V. Cadawas
H4. Clarita V. Cadawas

I. Pedro A. Cadawas – naging unang asawa si Maxima Magtibay na taga Sariyaya, Quezon.

Naging mga anak (3)
I1. Melito M. Cadawas
I2. Peping M. Cadawas
I3. Melba M. Cadawas

Nabalo si Pedro kay Maxima kaya naging ikalawang asawa ni Perdo A. Cadawas ay si Guillerma Cadapan pero wala silang naging anak ni Pedro at Guillerma.

J. Gregorio A. Cadawas – namatay noong bata pa lang.

2. Urbana E. Aga – naging asawa si Ceferino Mendoza.

Naging mga anak (2)
A. Eustaquia A. Mendoza
B. Casenta A. Mendoza

3. Silverio E. Aga – naging ikalawang asawa ni Josefa Aca, pero walang naging anak sina Silverio at Josefa.

Naging ikalawang asawa ni Andrea Edjawan si Esteban Cajugao kilala sa pamagat na Esteban Balanga at kapatid nina Toribio at Maria Cajugao.

Naging mga anak (6)
4. Silverio E. Cajugao – naging asawa si Mauricia Madreguerra. Silang dalawa ay nagkaroon ng maraming anak subalit malilit pa na halos hindi pa nabibinyagan ay nangangamatay na agad kaya sila ay walang nabuhay anak hanggang sa ang mag asawa ay kapwa na namatay.

5. Fernando E. Cajugao – naging asawa si Gliceria Baldemor.

Naging mga anak (2)
A. Juana B. Cajugao
B. Rufo B. Cajugao

6. Dominga E. Cajugao – namatay noong bata pa lang.
7. Juana E. Cajugao – namatay noong bata pa lang.
8. Susana E. Cajugao – namatay noong bata pa lang.
9. Leoncia E. Cajugao – namatay noong bata pa lang.

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mutuk
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Juana Edhauan San Josep - Sep. 17, 1854 - Mariano Edhauan San Josep & Estepania Padollion San Diego

Flrenteno Edhanang - Oct. 15, 1857 - Mariano Edhanang & Marcela Adia

Pelepe Edhauan - Apr. 30, 1860 - Mariano Edhauan & Marcela Adia



Edjauan, Felipe A. May 1, 1860 Mariano & Marcela Adia
Edjaoan, Agustina A. May 5, 1863 Mariano & Manuela Adia
Edjaoan, Celidonio A. Mar. 2, 1865 Mariano & Marcela Adia
Edjaoan, Mateo A. Jan. 27, 1871 Mariano & Marcela Adia
Edjaoan, Lucio A. Apr. 27, 1874 Mariano & Marcela Adia
Edjaoan, Tomas A. Jan. 27, 1877 Mariano & Marcela Adia
Grand Parents :
Antonio Edjaoan & Maria Candelaria
Juan Adia & Getrudes Victorina Santa Juana
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

# 182 Pablo Mercado carries out a friar intrigue -- Revelations -- Letters and other writings of Rizal to embarrass him -- Detention of the imposter -- Rizal's helpers: Edjawan and Agapay.

Dapitan, 20 December 1893

Mr. Manuel T. Hidalgo

My dear brother-in-law Maneng,

I was unable to write you by the previous mail for lack of time, for the boat left unexpectedly.

With regard to Pablo Mercado, I tell you that he came here presenting himself as a courteous friend in order to get from my letters, writings, etc.; but I found him out soon, and if I did not throw him out of the house brusquely, it was because I always want to be nice and polite to everyone. Nevertheless, as it was raining, I let him sleep here, sending him away very early the next day. I was going to let him alone in contempt but as the rascal went around saying secretly that he was my cousin or brother-in-law, I reported him to the Commander who had him arrested.

It was revealed in his declaration that he was sent by the Recollects who gave him 72 pesos and promised him more if he succeeded in wresting from me letters for certain persons in Manila. The rascal told me that he was a cousin of one Mr. Litonjua, son of Luis Chiquito, according to him and brother-in-law of Marciano Ramirez. He wanted me to write to these gentlemen. He brought along besides a picture of mine, saying that it was given to him by one Mr. Legazpi (1) of Tondo or San Nicolás, I don't remember exactly. It seems that he belongs to a good family of Cagayan de Misamis. Be careful of him; he is a tall boy, somewhat thickset, slightly squint-eyed, dark, lender, broad shoulders, and of impudent manners. He smokes much, spits more, and has thin lips.

With respect to what Abelardo may have, you can be right, so that hydrotherapy is not contradicted. It would not be bad in my opinion to give him something of strychnine, but one must know how to administer it.

I believe two boys of mine are going there: One of them is Mateo Edjawan, a very commendable young man, son of a gobernadorcillo of Paete, who has severed me well. You can ask him for details. The other one I believe is Pedro Agapay who is going to be in my father's service.

Here we are making some preparations for Christmas. We have made paper lanterns.

Alfredo's letter brought me much joy. By the character of his writing, though not much can be said because it is not yet well shaped, he seems to be a lad of clear intelligence, quiet, not very lively, fine, and with time, he will be reserved and will know how to keep secrets, his own and other people's. I don't believe he will be distinguished by the impetuosity of his ideas or of his character, but indeed, he will be pensive, a thinker, polite, and considerate. This is what I seem to divine by the character of his writing. But I may be mistaken half and half. He is affectionate besides.

[I send] many regards to Sra. Neneng whom I wish the best of health possible in this world.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Your brother-in-law who loves you,
José Rizal

Source: http://joserizal.info/Writings.....etters.htm
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Dapitan School Boy
Prologue
April 9, 1942


I weep shamelessly as my family look on, not knowing what to do. Who could know?

My dear wife, Jacoba, puts a comforting hand on my shoulder. My sons and daughters stare at each other, at the ceiling, the wall, the floor, anywhere but at their father.

My name is Jose Aseniero y Dalman. I am 63 years old, the head of my household. I’ve held various government posts and became governor of Dapitan when I was 46.

The Japanese are looking for me. They need me for propaganda purposes because of my connection with Dr. Jose P. Rizal. My respected teacher and mentor, whose memory I will keep alive and treasure until the day I die; how he loved this poor country and its people.

The final news from the Voice of Freedom crackled from the radio; the only link to the outside world for those of us who have fled and given up everything to save our families, our lives.

“Bataan has fallen, but the spirit that made it stand . . . cannot fail.”

With those devastating words, the Voice of Freedom went silent.

My brother and I have taken our families to hide in the thickly forested uplands of Dapitan that was once part of the Subanon tribe’s ancestral lands.

I weep for the future Filipinos face with our new conquerors. After enduring 400 years of Spanish rule followed by the Americans, once again, my country is overrun — now with the Japanese strangling our right to freedom.

My teacher made two very relevant remarks 47 years ago. One of them came to pass: “Whether we like it or not, English will be the spoken language of the Philippines.” Those were his words when he began our lessons in English.

My knowledge of the language came in very handy when the Americans came. It provided work for me, the means to feed my family.

The second remark applies to what Filipinos are now going through. Unfortunately, it has to do with the destruction and loss of lives. I can still remember the words of my most revered teacher.

It was during one of our lessons in Talisay that Dr. Rizal blurted out: “Mark my words, in 50 years the Philippines will be in the hands of the Japanese.”

One of my old schoolmates, Mateo Edjawan, showed up yesterday. He is originally from Paete, Laguna.

It took him weeks to make the trek here; by boat and on foot, constantly on the lookout for Japanese sentries patrolling the coastal shores and dense jungles.

He brings news of daily atrocities. He told us of Maria Rizal’s family in San Pablo.

“Ay, Joselito,” my friend said, addressing me by my childhood name. “The Japanese gather scores of people; gun them down or force them to walk with captured American soldiers for miles in the blazing heat until they drop dead. Everyday people are arrested and never seen again. Infants and children aren’t spared. I saw a soldier throw a baby up in the air, skewering that innocent with his bayonet.

“Like you and your family, many have fled to the mountains. Men join the guerilla effort in sabotaging Japanese garrisons and saving as many lives as they possibly can, but there are so few compared to the enemy.”

The tears flowed again; two grown men sobbed and there was no shame. It seems our only defense these days is to hide and weep uncontrollably, helpless to do anything.

Mateo wiped his tears. “Do you remember Encarnacion, the daughter of the maestro’s sister, Maria?”

“Yes, of course,” I said, still remembering Encarnacion as a little girl and her younger brother, Moris. “I remember them and their mother Maria, very well.”

When the maestro began courting Josephine Bracken, Maria suspected her of spying on her brother for the friars. She instructed her daughter what to say whenever Josephine came around asking for the doctor.

“Sleeping!” It was the first English word the child learned.

“Joselito,” my friend said, pulling me back to the present. He related what Encarnacion told him happened to her family in San Pablo, Laguna.

“The people who did not flee from the Japanese in San Pablo were instructed to gather in the town’s cathedral,” Mateo said.

I remembered a trip I made there after Rizal’s execution. “I know that church, the simple dome and the whitewashed walls inside decorated with the Stations of the Cross.”

“Encarnacion, her two daughters, their husbands and children along with other families, made their way to the cathedral,” Mateo said.

“What awaited them were Japanese soldiers manning machine guns at the altar, at the ready to mow down the citizens of San Pablo.

“The mayor told the men to arm themselves with their machetes and bolo knives; they had nothing more to lose except their precious lives.”

Mateo talked of the brave men of San Pablo who bared their useless weapons, ready to fight and die, knowing these were no match for the rapid spray of bullets, knowing they would be cut down before getting within reach of the soldiers.

The blatant courage of the men had an effect on the Japanese. They backed off, but took with them 300 or so of San Pablo’s Chinese citizens. These poor people were made to dig their own graves before they were gunned down.

Rizal’s sister Maria was living with her son, Moris, in Manila when the near massacre and the killing of the Chinese families occurred.

I remembered hearing the news of the rape of Nanking. The Japanese burned, looted, sacked and murdered for weeks. Disemboweled the Chinese in the streets, raped women and girls round the clock, used old people, women and children for sword and bayonet practice, buried people alive.

They said the Yangtze River was choked with machine-gunned corpses.

Will all this to be visited on the Philippines as well? American General Douglas MacArthur left us to our fate, promising to return. But when will that be?

Should I not weep?

If I do not survive this war and the atrocities being inflicted on my fellow citizens, in case I leave my wife without a husband and my children without a father, I leave behind a legacy. It’s not money or property; its worth is more than all that I’ve accumulated, more than any man’s accomplishment in a lifetime.

I say this because I’m one of a handful who had the unique opportunity to spend time and learn from Dr. Rizal, a great man we will not see again. Except for the months when he was arrested and shipped to Spain, I never left his side.

My age and fading memory may not bring past events into exact focus, but I will write down each memory that comes to mind.

Historians and biographers have come and gone, digging for information of my maestro’s exile. These learned men were mostly interested to know if he collaborated with the rebels and other political intrigues.

They never bothered to ask any of us, his students, of our experiences with our maestro; the son and brother, doctor, scientist, poet, artist, writer, lover, the man. I will write about the precious time spent with our teacher while I still possess my faculties and my life. Maybe when the world is no longer mad, my son, Francisco will preserve my memory of a long ago time.

This is my story . . .

source: http://www.patriciamagdalenala.....ter-1.html
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